Biblioteca Universidad Nebrija mOpac 2.3

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Revista: Language Learning

(30 Registros)

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Behavioral and Neural Responses to Tone Errors in Foreign-Accented Mandarin [Recurso electrónico] / Eric Pelzl ... [et al.].

a b 211006s2021 usa||||sr 0 ||eng d 124609 eng 2021 Behavioral and Neural Responses to Tone Errors in Foreign-Accented Mandarin [Recurso electrónico] / Eric Pelzl ... [et al.]. Este artículo se encuentra disponible en su edición electrónica. Su acceso electrónico es a través del enlace de 'Acceso al documento'. References: p. 446-450. Previous event-related potentials (ERP) research has investigated how foreign accent modulates listeners’ neural responses to lexical-semantic and morphosyntactic errors. We extended this line of research to consider whether pronunciation errors in Mandarin Chinese are processed differently when a foreign-accented speaker makes them relative to when a native-accented speaker makes them (a conceptual replication using the materials from Pelzl et al., 2019). We evaluated behavioral judgments, the N400, and late positive component while native speakers listened to native and foreign-accented sentences containing tone and rhyme pronunciation errors. We observed effects that suggested that the participants were prone to detect errors in foreign-accented speech more often in sentences with no critical word deviation but also were less likely to reject critical tone errors produced by the foreign-accented speaker. ERP results showed a main effect of accent on late positive components that suggested a difference in degree for sensitivity to foreign-accented compared to native-accented pronunciation errors rather than a completely different response pattern. We found no effect of accent on N400s, with statistically significant differences between tone and rhyme errors regardless of speaker accent. Accented speech Pronunciation Lexical tones Mandarin Event-related potentials Language learning. -- 2021 (June), v. 71, n. 2, p. 414-452 Language learning. -- 2021 (June), v. 71, n. 2, p. 414-452 https://search-ebscohost-com.ezproxy.nebrija.es/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=56405511&lang=es&site=ehost-live Acceso al documento

Bilingual and multilingual mental lexicon [Recurso electrónico]: a modeling study with linear discriminative learning / Yu-Ying Chuang ... [et al.].

a b 210410s2021 usa||||sr 0 ||eng d 120622 eng 2021 Bilingual and multilingual mental lexicon [Recurso electrónico]: a modeling study with linear discriminative learning / Yu-Ying Chuang ... [et al.]. Este artículo se encuentra disponible en su edición electrónica. Su acceso electrónico es a través del enlace de 'Acceso al documento'. References: p. 281-290. This study addresses whether there is anything special about learning a third language, as compared to learning a second language, that results solely from the order of acquisition. We use a computational model based on the mathematical framework of Linear Discriminative Learning to explore this question for the acquisition of a small trilingual vocabulary, with English as L1, German or Mandarin as L2, and Mandarin or Dutch as L3. Our simulations reveal that when qualitative differences emerge between the learning of a first, second, and third language, these differences emerge from distributional properties of the particular languages involved rather than the order of acquisition per se, or any difference in learning mechanism. One such property is the number of homophones in each language, since within‐language homophones give rise to errors in production. Our simulations also show the importance of suprasegmental information in determining the kinds of production errors made. Bilingualism Mental lexicon Linear discriminative learning Multilingualism Homophony Language learning. -- 2021 (March), v. 71, supp. 1, p. 219-292 Language learning. -- 2021 (March), v. 71, supp. 1, p. 219-292 http://search.ebscohost.com.ezproxy.nebrija.es/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=55383505&lang=es&site=ehost-live Acceso al documento

A case for Multisite Second Language Acquisition Research [Recurso electrónico] : challenges, risks, and rewards / Kara Moranski, Nicole Ziegler.

a b 210414s2021 usa||||sr 0 ||eng d 120678 eng 2021 A case for Multisite Second Language Acquisition Research [Recurso electrónico] : challenges, risks, and rewards / Kara Moranski, Nicole Ziegler. Este artículo se encuentra disponible en su edición electrónica. Su acceso electrónico es a través del enlace de 'Acceso al documento'. References: p. 233-241. Multisite research (MSR) offers the key advantages of greater statistical power and external validity via larger and more diverse participant pools. In second language acquisition (SLA) research, recent developments in meta&-analysis have created a robust foundation for MSR. Although logistical and financial obstacles can complicate expansion beyond a single site, we show that MSR's benefits can justify the investment of resources. We begin by outlining how developments in meta-analytic research, replication, and access to data and materials have created an especially opportune moment for MSR. Next, we discuss the methodology for a classroom study on metacognitive instruction as an illustrative case, outlining the major elements of its design and implementation. Finally, we review how four issues critical to MSRs (funding, compliance, logistics, and analysis) were addressed in our example study, including a discussion on multilevel modeling. We conclude with a discussion of how the field can build upon existing research to advance multisite work. Multisite Research methods Classroom research Metacognitive instruction Corrective feedback Language learning. -- 2021 (March), v. 71, n. 1, p. 204-242 Language learning. -- 2021 (March), v. 71, n. 1, p. 204-242 http://search.ebscohost.com.ezproxy.nebrija.es/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=55274972&lang=es&site=ehost-live Acceso al documento

Cognitive Predictors of Child Second Language Comprehension and Syntactic Learning [Recurso electrónico] : Evidence for the Confluence of General Vocabulary and Text-Connecting Functions / Diana Pili-Moss.

a b 211007s2021 usa||||sr 0 ||eng d 124631 eng 2021 Cognitive Predictors of Child Second Language Comprehension and Syntactic Learning [Recurso electrónico] : Evidence for the Confluence of General Vocabulary and Text-Connecting Functions / Diana Pili-Moss. Este artículo se encuentra disponible en su edición electrónica. Su acceso electrónico es a través del enlace de 'Acceso al documento'. References: p. 938-943. This study examined the role of child cognitive abilities for procedural and declarative learning in the earliest stages of second language (L2) exposure. In the context of a computer game, 53 first language Italian monolingual children were aurally trained in a novel miniature language over 3 consecutive days. A mixed effects model analysis of the relationship between cognitive predictors and outcomes in morphosyntax measured via a grammaticality judgment test (GJT) was performed. Relative to adults trained in the same paradigm, children with higher procedural learning ability (measured via an alternate serial reaction time task) showed significantly better learning of word order, although the effect size was small. Modeling accuracy in online sentence comprehension during the game also evidenced that higher procedural learning ability was positively associated with significantly better outcomes as practice progressed. By contrast, a composite measure of verbal and visual declarative learning ability did not predict L2 outcomes in either the GJT or the online measure. Declarative learning ability Procedural learning ability Child L2 learning L2 cognitive aptitude Implicit statistical learning Language learning. -- 2021 (September), v. 71, n. 3, p. 907-945 Language learning. -- 2021 (September), v. 71, n. 3, p. 907-945 https://search-ebscohost-com.ezproxy.nebrija.es/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=57355036&lang=es&site=ehost-live Acceso al documento

Collocational processing in L1 and L2 [Recurso electrónico] : the effects of word frequency, collocational frequency, and association / Dogus Öksüz, Vaclav Brezina, Patrick Rebuschat.

a b 210412s2021 usa||||sr 0 ||eng d 120639 eng 2021 Collocational processing in L1 and L2 [Recurso electrónico] : the effects of word frequency, collocational frequency, and association /Dogus Öksüz, Vaclav Brezina, Patrick Rebuschat. Este artículo se encuentra disponible en su edición electrónica. Su acceso electrónico es a través del enlace de 'Acceso al documento'. References: p. 90-96. This study investigated the effects of individual word frequency, collocational frequency, and association on L1 and L2 collocational processing. An acceptability judgment task was administered to L1 and L2 speakers of English. Response times were analyzed using mixed-effects modeling for 3 types of adjective–noun pairs: (a) high-frequency, (b) low-frequency, and (c) baseline items. This study extends previous research by examining whether the effects of individual word and collocation frequency counts differ for L1 and L2 speakers’ processing of collocations. This study also compared the extent to which L1 and L2 speakers’ response times are affected by mutual information and log Dice scores, which are corpus-derived association measures. Both groups of participants demonstrated sensitivity to individual word and collocation frequency counts. However, there was a reduced effect of individual word frequency counts for processing high-frequency collocations compared to low-frequency collocations. Both groups of participants were similarly sensitive to the association measures used. Multiword sequences Collocation Collocational processing Advanced learners Association measures Mutual information Log Dice Language learning. -- 2021 (March), v. 71, n. 1, p. 55-98 Language learning. -- 2021 (March), v. 71, n. 1, p. 55-98 http://search.ebscohost.com.ezproxy.nebrija.es/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=55274964&lang=es&site=ehost-live Acceso al documento

Complexity in multilingualism (research) [Recurso electrónico] / Claus Beisbart.

a b 210316s2021 usa||||sr 0 ||eng d 119394 eng 2021 Complexity in multilingualism (research) [Recurso electrónico] /Claus Beisbart. Este artículo se encuentra disponible en su edición electrónica. Su acceso electrónico es a través del enlace de 'Acceso al documento'. References: p. 73-77. Does complexity make multilingualism special? Since there is no unequivocal notion of complexity on which researchers agree, several characteristics that have been considered crucial for complexity are brought to bear on multilingualism. While multilingualism is fairly complex in some senses, for instance, because it requires that many variables be studied, it is less clear whether multilingualism becomes special in this way. The most salient possible way in which multilingualism might be special due to its complexity is that qualitatively new features emerge as we move from mono- or bilingualism to multilingualism. While research in mathematics and physics has shown examples in which novel features emerge at a certain level, related results are not easily transferred to multilingualism. This is shown by analyzing the application of dynamic systems theory to multilingualism by Herdina and Jessner. It is ultimately a matter of empirical research whether there are suitable novel features that make multilingualism special. Modeling Nonlinearity Chaos Emergence Dynamic systems theory Philosophy of science Language learning. -- 2021 (March), v. 71, supp. 1, p. 39-79 Language learning. -- 2021 (March), v. 71, supp. 1, p. 39-79 http://search.ebscohost.com.ezproxy.nebrija.es/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=55383509&lang=es&site=ehost-live Acceso al documento

Crosslinguistic sharing of morphological awareness in biliteracy development [Recurso electrónico] : a systematic review and meta-analysis of correlation coefficients / Sihui (Echo) Ke, Ryan T. Miller, Dongbo Zhang, Keiko Koda.

a b 210410s2021 usa||||sr 0 ||eng d 120626 eng 2021 Crosslinguistic sharing of morphological awareness in biliteracy development [Recurso electrónico] : a systematic review and meta-analysis of correlation coefficients / Sihui (Echo) Ke, Ryan T. Miller, Dongbo Zhang, Keiko Koda. Este artículo se encuentra disponible en su edición electrónica. Su acceso electrónico es a través del enlace de 'Acceso al documento'. References: p. 45-52. This study examined the crosslinguistic sharing of morphological awareness (MA) in biliteracy development. The analysis included 34 correlational studies with 41 independent samples (N= 4,104). Correlational coefficients were meta-analyzed, yielding four main findings: (a) the correlation between first language (L1) and second language (L2) MA was small (r= .30); (b) the interlingual correlations between L1 MA and L2 word decoding and between L1 MA and L2 reading comprehension were both small (r= .35, .39, respectively); (c) the intralingual correlations between L2 MA and L2 word decoding and between L2 MA and L2 reading comprehension were both moderate (r= .46, .52, respectively); and (d) MA measurement type and age were significant moderators. Our review suggests that there is a need for future research to align the definition and measurement of MA. Morphological awareness Crosslinguistic sharing Biliteracy Second language reading Meta-analysis Language learning. -- 2021 (March), v. 71, n. 1, p. 8-54 Language learning. -- 2021 (March), v. 71, n. 1, p. 8-54 http://search.ebscohost.com.ezproxy.nebrija.es/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=55274966&lang=es&site=ehost-live Acceso al documento

Danish as a Window Onto Language Processing and Learning [Recurso electrónico] / Fabio Trecca ... [et al.].

a b 211007s2021 usa||||sr 0 ||eng d 124627 eng 2021 Danish as a Window Onto Language Processing and Learning [Recurso electrónico] / Fabio Trecca ... [et al.]. Este artículo se encuentra disponible en su edición electrónica. Su acceso electrónico es a través del enlace de 'Acceso al documento'. References: p. 824-831. It is often assumed that all languages are fundamentally the same. This assumption has been challenged by research in linguistic typology and language evolution, but questions of language learning and use have largely been left aside. Here we review recent work on Danish that provides new insights into these questions. Unlike closely related languages, Danish has an unusually reduced phonetic structure, which seemingly delays Danish-learning children in several aspects of their language acquisition. Adult language use appears to be affected as well, resulting, among other things, in an increased dependence on top-down information in comprehension. In this conceptual review, we build the argument that a causal relationship may exist between the sound structure of Danish and the peculiarities of its acquisition and use. We argue that a theory of language learning that accommodates the existing evidence from Danish must explicitly account for the interaction between learner-related factors and language-specific constraints. Danish Language processing Language acquisition Phonetics Top-down information Learnability Language learning. -- 2021 (September), v. 71, n. 3, p. 799-833 Language learning. -- 2021 (September), v. 71, n. 3, p. 799-833 https://search-ebscohost-com.ezproxy.nebrija.es/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=57355040&lang=es&site=ehost-live Acceso al documento

Distributional learning of speech sounds [Recurso electrónico]: an exploratory study into the effects of prior language experience / Katerina Chladkova, Sarka Simackova.

a b 210412s2021 usa||||sr 0 ||eng d 120649 eng 2021 Distributional learning of speech sounds [Recurso electrónico]: an exploratory study into the effects of prior language experience /Katerina Chladkova, Sarka Simackova. Este artículo se encuentra disponible en su edición electrónica. Su acceso electrónico es a través del enlace de 'Acceso al documento'. References: p. 156-160. Distributional learning is typically understood as (unattended) tracking of stimulus probabilities. Distributional training with speech yields mixed results and the influencing factors have not yet been fully investigated. This study explored whether prior linguistic experience could have an effect on distributional learning outcomes. Czech and Greek adults, whose native languages contain and lack abstract length categories, respectively, were exposed to novel vowels falling into unimodal or bimodal distributions along the durational dimension. A trending interaction suggested that the Czechs and the Greeks might have been affected differently by the distributional exposure. Improved discrimination of the “trained” contrast was observed in bimodally exposed Czechs (whose prior expectations about length categories could guide learning) and, rather surprisingly, in unimodally exposed Greeks (who, lacking any expectations, might have listened in a noncategorical, auditory mode). Prior linguistic experience could thus affect whether and how experienced language users exploit new distributional speech statistics. This proposal needs to be assessed in future studies. Distributional learning Prior experience Vowel length Speech sound learning Language learning. -- 2021 (March), v. 71, n. 1, p. 131-161 Language learning. -- 2021 (March), v. 71, n. 1, p. 131-161 http://search.ebscohost.com.ezproxy.nebrija.es/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=55274970&lang=es&site=ehost-live Acceso al documento

Domain-General Auditory Processing Partially Explains Second Language Speech Learning in Classroom Settings [Recurso electrónico] : A Review and Generalization Study / Kazuya Saito ... [et al.].

a b 211006s2021 usa||||sr 0 ||eng d 124616 eng 2021 Domain-General Auditory Processing Partially Explains Second Language Speech Learning in Classroom Settings [Recurso electrónico] : A Review and Generalization Study / Kazuya Saito ... [et al.]. Este artículo se encuentra disponible en su edición electrónica. Su acceso electrónico es a través del enlace de 'Acceso al documento'. References: p. 705-713. To date, a growing number of studies have shown that domain-general auditory processing, which prior work has linked to L1 acquisition, could explain various dimensions of naturalistic L2 speech proficiency. The current study examined the generalizability of this topic to L2 speech learning in classroom settings. The spontaneous speech samples of 39 Vietnamese English-as-a-foreign-language learners were analyzed for fluent and accurate use of pronunciation and lexicogrammar and linked to a range of variables in their auditory processing profiles. The results identified moderate-to-strong correlations between the participants’ accurate use of lexicogrammar and audio-motor sequence integration scores (i.e., the ability to reproduce melodic/rhythmic information). However, the relationship between phonological proficiency and auditory acuity (i.e., the ability to encode acoustic details of sounds) was nonsignificant. Although the findings support the audition-acquisition link to classroom L2 speech learning to some degree, they only suggest that this link is robust for the acquisition of lexicogrammar information. Second language speech Pronunciation Auditory processing Foreign language learning Language learning. -- 2021 (September), v. 71, n. 3, p. 669-715 Language learning. -- 2021 (September), v. 71, n. 3, p. 669-715 https://search-ebscohost-com.ezproxy.nebrija.es/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=57355042&lang=es&site=ehost-live Acceso al documento

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