Biblioteca Universidad Nebrija mOpac 2.3

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Revista: Language Teaching Research

(22 Registros)

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Resultados

A comparison of writing tasks in ESL writing and first-year composition courses [Recurso electrónico] : A case study of one US university / Jooyoung Lee.

a b 211007s2021 usa||||sr 0 ||eng d 124634 eng 2021 A comparison of writing tasks in ESL writing and first-year composition courses [Recurso electrónico] : A case study of one US university /Jooyoung Lee. Este artículo se encuentra disponible en su edición electrónica. Su acceso electrónico es a través del enlace de 'Acceso al documento'. References: p. 376-377. Many international students in American universities are required to take writing courses in English as a second language (ESL) before participating in a mainstream first-year composition (FYC) course. Given that the goal of ESL writing course is to prepare students for FYC course, the connection between ESL and FYC courses is significant. This study investigates the correspondence of two such courses in terms of writing tasks based on the analysis of course syllabi, assignment sheets, and interviews with eight ESL course and 10 FYC instructors as well as 26 international students who are from diverse countries and took both composition courses. The findings suggest that students’ assignments from both courses are all essays in terms of genre, but show differences with regard to the text’s purpose, audience, information source, topic, and rhetorical function. Students are also aware of such similarities and differences, but occasionally demonstrate less sophisticated or inaccurate understanding of the assignments. Pedagogical implications for modifying the writing assignments in ESL courses to fit the expectations of FYC courses are discussed. ESL writing course First-year composition course Writing tasks Language teaching research. -- 2021 (May), v. 25, n. 3, p. 360-377 Language teaching research. -- 2021 (May), v. 25, n. 3, p. 360-377 https://search-ebscohost-com.ezproxy.nebrija.es/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=50886680&lang=es&site=ehost-live Acceso al documento

Because words matter [Recurso electrónico] : Investigating vocabulary development across contexts and modalities / Victoria Zaytseva, Imma Miralpeix, Carmen Pérez-Vidal.

a b 210602s2021 usa||||sr 0 ||eng d 121205 eng 2021 Because words matter [Recurso electrónico] : Investigating vocabulary development across contexts and modalities / Victoria Zaytseva, Imma Miralpeix, Carmen Pérez-Vidal. Este artículo se encuentra disponible en su edición electrónica. Su acceso electrónico es a través del enlace de 'Acceso al documento'. References: p. 180-183. The present study investigates the effects of two subsequent learning contexts, formal instruction (FI) at home and a 3-month stay abroad (SA), on vocabulary acquisition in English as a foreign language (EFL) writing and speaking. Data were collected from 30 Catalan/Spanish learners of English before and after each learning period using a written composition and an oral interview. These samples were examined in terms of quantitative measures of lexical proficiency in the domains of diversity, sophistication, density and accuracy. Native-speaker baseline data were also obtained through the same tasks for comparison purposes. Results reveal that SA is particularly beneficial for written productive vocabulary, and less so for oral, and that progress occurs especially in lexical diversity. FI, however, shows a modest effect on the improvement of oral productive vocabulary and affects namely lexical sophistication. ESL Lexical proficiency Oral-written connection Production modality Speaking Study abroad Vocabulary acquisition Writing Language teaching research. -- 2021 (March), v. 25, n. 2, p. 162-184 Language teaching research. -- 2021 (March), v. 25, n. 2, p. 162-184 http://search.ebscohost.com.ezproxy.nebrija.es/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=50886722&lang=es&site=ehost-live Acceso al documento

Challenging discourses of deficit [Recurso electrónico] : Understanding the vibrancy and complexity of multilingualism through language trajectory grids / Julie Choi, Yvette Slaughter.

a b 210602s2021 usa||||sr 0 ||eng d 121201 eng 2021 Challenging discourses of deficit [Recurso electrónico] : Understanding the vibrancy and complexity of multilingualism through language trajectory grids / Julie Choi, Yvette Slaughter. Este artículo se encuentra disponible en su edición electrónica. Su acceso electrónico es a través del enlace de 'Acceso al documento'. References: p. 101-104. The ‘multilingual turn’ has opened up a variety of creative, participatory methods for researchers and educators to explore language learners’ linguistic repertoires, language practices and resources, and linguistic experiences. In this article, we draw on data from the English as an additional language (EAL) secondary school classroom context where we use what we call ‘language trajectory grids’ to make visible EAL students’ English language learning experiences. The grid activity involves plotting learners’ emotions, practices, relationships, and life circumstances with their resources, practices and historical events onto a chronological grid. Using a narrative structure to make sense of learners’ grids and the ‘small stories’ (Barkhuizen, 2009) participants shared during the activity, we discuss the affordances of such devices in opening up space for teachers and learners to critically reflect on the complexities and vibrancy of contemporary multilingual language journeys; to recognize situational factors that influence dispositions towards language, language learning and identity; and as a powerful starting point for students and teachers to engage in ‘collaborative relations of power’. Language learning experiences Language trajectory grids Linguistic repertoires Multilingualism Participatory visual methods Language teaching research. -- 2021 (January), v. 25, n. 1, p. 81-104 Language teaching research. -- 2021 (January), v. 25, n. 1, p. 81-104 http://search.ebscohost.com.ezproxy.nebrija.es/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=53772847&lang=es&site=ehost-live Acceso al documento

Challenging the monolingual mindset [Recurso electrónico] : Understanding plurilingual pedagogies in English as an Additional Language (EAL) classrooms / Yvette Slaughter, Russell Cross.

a b 210602s2021 usa||||sr 0 ||eng d 121198 eng 2021 Challenging the monolingual mindset [Recurso electrónico] : Understanding plurilingual pedagogies in English as an Additional Language (EAL) classrooms / Yvette Slaughter, Russell Cross. Este artículo se encuentra disponible en su edición electrónica. Su acceso electrónico es a través del enlace de 'Acceso al documento'. References: p. 58-60. Current theories of bilingualism argue that the language practices of bilinguals are drawn from a single linguistic repertoire, and that enabling access to the full breadth of students’ language practices can be a vital resource for further language development. This challenges commonplace practices within English as an Additional Language (EAL) education in Australia, where curriculum, pedagogy, and assessment are predicated on monolingual (English-only) structures. Even though many teachers identify with the need to draw on students’ linguistic repertoires, a lack of pedagogical guidance can result in disengagement with this issue. As we move towards identifying and systematizing plurilingual practices, it is imperative we understand teacher stance towards the use of languages other than English in the classroom. This research, therefore, sought to explore the use of language mapping to build teachers’ awareness of their students’ communicative lifeworlds, and to reflect on their stance towards students’ languages (other than English) in contexts where the focus is learning English as an additional language. The findings illustrate pedagogical practices which go at least some way to subverting the dominance of English-only structures, as well as demonstrating that teacher positioning towards the use of first languages is dynamic in that it is responsive to changes in student context, as well as to new knowledge, as gained through the language mapping activities. Language learning Linguistic repertoires Pedagogy Teacher agency Translanguaging Language teaching research. -- 2021 (January), v. 25, n. 1, p. 39-60 Language teaching research. -- 2021 (January), v. 25, n. 1, p. 39-60 http://search.ebscohost.com.ezproxy.nebrija.es/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=53780023&lang=es&site=ehost-live Acceso al documento

Drawing on students’ diverse language resources to facilitate learning in a Japanese–English bilingual program in Australia [Recurso electrónico] / Marianne Turner.

a b 210602s2021 usa||||sr 0 ||eng d 121200 eng 2021 Drawing on students’ diverse language resources to facilitate learning in a Japanese–English bilingual program in Australia [Recurso electrónico] / Marianne Turner. Este artículo se encuentra disponible en su edición electrónica. Su acceso electrónico es a través del enlace de 'Acceso al documento'. References: p. 77-80. Recently, the incorporation of students’ home languages into monolingual classrooms has been reinvigorated by a scholarly focus on extended linguistic repertoire. In bilingual programs, ideas of language separation have traditionally influenced teaching and learning as a way to protect the minority language, but there is a growing call to engage with the complexity of students’ language practices. In this article, it is suggested that the English-medium (dominant language) classroom can be an effective site for exploring how to leverage and affirm students’ home language practices in bilingual education, and also to support the minority language in the program. Data are drawn from a design-based study that investigated the transition of a Japanese–English primary bilingual program from 30% of instruction in Japanese to a 50:50 program. As part of the study, a Foundation teacher and a Year 5/6 teacher worked towards English curriculum objectives by incorporating languages their students spoke at home, including Japanese, into the English-medium classes. Findings revealed that some Foundation students did not immediately draw on home language practices, instead choosing to use Japanese, whereas the Year 5/6 students demonstrated ambivalence towards Japanese but not towards other language practices. Australia Bilingual program Japanese Linguistically diverse students Primary Translanguaging Language teaching research. -- 2021 (January), v. 25, n. 1, p. 61-80 Language teaching research. -- 2021 (January), v. 25, n. 1, p. 61-80 http://search.ebscohost.com.ezproxy.nebrija.es/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=53785054&lang=es&site=ehost-live Acceso al documento

The effect of feedback timing on L2 Spanish vocabulary acquisition in synchronous computer-mediated communication [Recurso electrónico] / Carly Henderson.

a b 210602s2021 usa||||sr 0 ||eng d 121206 eng 2021 The effect of feedback timing on L2 Spanish vocabulary acquisition in synchronous computer-mediated communication [Recurso electrónico] / Carly Henderson. Este artículo se encuentra disponible en su edición electrónica. Su acceso electrónico es a través del enlace de 'Acceso al documento'. References: p. 202-206. The benefits of corrective feedback (CF) for second language (L2) learning are empirically attested, and multiple factors mediating CF effectiveness have been investigated. However, the timing of oral CF has received less attention given most research examines corrections provided immediately after an error. Delayed CF also warrants investigation; it occurs naturally in L2 classrooms and may be an appealing alternative in online learning contexts. Existing CF timing research shows either no significant differences between immediate and delayed CF, or advantages for immediate CF. To elucidate mixed findings, more CF timing studies are needed, especially those considering the effects of factors such as CF type, linguistic target and communication mode. Regarding communication mode, the effect of CF timing on errors made during text-based synchronous computer-mediated communication (SCMC), for instance, has received less attention. Examining text-based SCMC is important given its empirically attested benefits for L2 learning, and in some cases its advantage over face-to-face interaction for fostering CF effectiveness. Investigating the role of CF timing on errors made in text-based SCMC will contribute to efforts to maximize CF effectiveness in online learning environments, which are becoming increasingly common. In this study, 30 third-year learners of Spanish as a foreign language completed a one-way information-gap task with an interlocutor using Skype text-chat. On vocabulary errors, learners received either immediate or delayed error repetition plus recast, or no CF. Results revealed both CF groups significantly outperformed the comparison group on an oral picture description task, with no significant differences between immediate and delayed CF. Results may be due to the salience of the CF modality, type, and target. Corrective feedback (CF) timing Recast Repetition Spanish vocabulary learning Text-based synchronous computer-mediated communication (SCMC) Text-chat Language teaching research. -- 2021 (March), v. 25, n. 2, p. 185-208 Language teaching research. -- 2021 (March), v. 25, n. 2, p. 185-208 http://search.ebscohost.com.ezproxy.nebrija.es/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=50173811&lang=es&site=ehost-live Acceso al documento

Effects of differences in language aptitude on learning grammatical collocations under elaborated input conditions [Recurso electrónico] / Najmeh Farshi, Mansoor Tavakoli.

a b 211008s2021 usa||||sr 0 ||eng d 124658 eng 2021 Effects of differences in language aptitude on learning grammatical collocations under elaborated input conditions [Recurso electrónico] /Najmeh Farshi, Mansoor Tavakoli. Este artículo se encuentra disponible en su edición electrónica. Su acceso electrónico es a través del enlace de 'Acceso al documento'. References: p. 493-496. The purpose of this study was to find out, whether three methods of presenting input, were effective in relation to language aptitude. Persian-speaking learners of English were provided with 20 grammatical collocations (verb–preposition collocations) embedded in authentic passages, lexically/grammatically elaborated passages, and lexically/grammatically elaborated passages with shorter sentences and enhanced target collocations. Participants were assessed on their receptive knowledge and productive knowledge of the grammatical collocations by a posttest and a delayed posttest, and their scores were correlated with various measures of language aptitude. The results suggested that modified elaborated input, which provided more focus on form (FonF), positively affected immediate and long-term gains in receptive knowledge and ruled out individual differences (IDs) in language aptitude. The results also implicated working memory (WM) as an explanatory variable in immediate and long-term achievements in productive knowledge under all the conditions of presenting input. Elaborated input Genuine input Grammatical collocation Language aptitude Modified elaborated input Phrasal verbs Language teaching research. -- 2021 (May), v. 25, n. 3, p. 476-499 Language teaching research. -- 2021 (May), v. 25, n. 3, p. 476-499 https://search-ebscohost-com.ezproxy.nebrija.es/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=50886505&lang=es&site=ehost-live Acceso al documento

The effects of working memory and declarative memory on instructed second language vocabulary learning [Recurso electrónico] : Insights from intelligent CALL / Simón Ruiz, Patrick Rebuschat, Detmar Meurers.

a b 211008s2021 usa||||sr 0 ||eng d 124660 eng 2021 The effects of working memory and declarative memory on instructed second language vocabulary learning [Recurso electrónico] : Insights from intelligent CALL / Simón Ruiz, Patrick Rebuschat, Detmar Meurers. Este artículo se encuentra disponible en su edición electrónica. Su acceso electrónico es a través del enlace de 'Acceso al documento'. References: p. 533-539. The extent to which learners benefit from instruction may be largely dependent on their individual abilities. However, there is relatively little work on the interaction between instructional effectiveness in second language learning and learner individual factors. In this study, we investigated the relationship between instruction, individual differences in cognitive abilities (working memory and declarative memory), and second language vocabulary acquisition in the context of web-based intelligent computer assisted language learning (ICALL). To this end, 127 adult learners of English, predominantly advanced-level, German-speaking learners, read news texts on the web for about two weeks using an ICALL system under two instructional conditions: form-focused and meaning-focused instruction. Learners in the form-focused condition read and completed automatically-generated multiple-choice gaps where phrasal verbs appeared in the text, while learners in the meaning-focused condition simply read and did not complete any gaps. Mixed-effects regression analyses showed that working memory was associated with vocabulary acquisition and that this association depended on the instructional context, with working memory being predictive of learning only in the form-focused condition, suggesting an aptitude-treatment interaction. Furthermore, declarative memory abilities were related to learning only as measured by the Continuous Visual Memory Task, and the relationship was not moderated by instructional condition. Overall, the study contributes to accounting for variability in second language learning in general, as well as in instructional contexts supported by intelligent CALL. Aptitude-treatment interaction Declarative memory Individual differences Intelligent computer Assisted language learning Working memory Language teaching research. -- 2021 (May), v. 25, n. 3, p. 510-539 Language teaching research. -- 2021 (May), v. 25, n. 3, p. 510-539 https://search-ebscohost-com.ezproxy.nebrija.es/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=50909967&lang=es&site=ehost-live Acceso al documento

The effects of written corrective feedback on the accuracy of L2 writing [Recurso electrónico] : Comparing collaborative and individual revision behavior / YouJin Kim, Lena Emeliyanova.

a b 210602s2021 usa||||sr 0 ||eng d 121208 eng 2021 The effects of written corrective feedback on the accuracy of L2 writing [Recurso electrónico] : Comparing collaborative and individual revision behavior / YouJin Kim, Lena Emeliyanova. Este artículo se encuentra disponible en su edición electrónica. Su acceso electrónico es a través del enlace de 'Acceso al documento'. References: p. 252-254. Although the effects of different types of written corrective feedback (WCF) have been examined in great detail, learners’ revision behavior in response to WCF has not been systematically investigated. The current study compared students’ classroom revision behaviors when they worked in pairs and when they worked individually. It further compared the effects of students’ collaborative and individual revision of teachers’ indirect WCF on accuracy development in their subsequent writing. A total of 36 learners of English as a second language (ESL) completed four timed essays over an 8-week academic session. The instructor provided indirect WCF on students’ essays, and the students revised their writing either individually (the self-correction group) or in pairs (the pair-correction group). The students’ revision behavior was analysed in terms of the correctness of revised errors. The accuracy of their writing was analysed in terms of the number of error-free T-units and the total number of errors for each 100 words. The findings indicated that the pair-correction group corrected their errors at a higher rate of accuracy than the self-correction group. Both groups showed significant improvement in the accuracy of their writing after receiving feedback during the 8-week session; however, no difference in improvement was found between the self-correction and the pair-correction groups. Accuracy development Classroom-based research Learner collaboration Written corrective feedback Second language writing Language teaching research. -- 2021 (March), v. 25, n. 2, p. 234-255 Language teaching research. -- 2021 (March), v. 25, n. 2, p. 234-255 http://search.ebscohost.com.ezproxy.nebrija.es/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=50173809&lang=es&site=ehost-live Acceso al documento

Exploring the relationship between linguistic knowledge and strategy use in listening comprehension [Recurso electrónico] / Daniel Fung, Ernesto Macaro.

a b 211008s2021 usa||||sr 0 ||eng d 124661 eng 2021 Exploring the relationship between linguistic knowledge and strategy use in listening comprehension [Recurso electrónico] / Daniel Fung, Ernesto Macaro. Este artículo se encuentra disponible en su edición electrónica. Su acceso electrónico es a través del enlace de 'Acceso al documento'. References: p. 558-560. The language learner strategies research field has often tried to identify the good language learner (GLL) by distinguishing more proficient from less proficient learners. However the notion of ‘good’ may be problematic without taking into account an individual’s linguistic knowledge (LK). This article foregrounds LK in relation to strategy use in the context of ‘listening to the teacher’: a language use task relatively under-researched. Secondary school students in Hong Kong (n= 646) completed a questionnaire and tests of LK including vocabulary and grammar. Lower LK learners reported using more translation strategies, whereas those with higher LK reported using a range of additional strategies. A further cluster analysis, however, indicated that a sub-group of lower LK learners were comparably strategic with the higher LK group perhaps compensating for low LK via strategy deployment. This article provides evidence that strategy deployment when listening to the teacher is not wholly constrained by levels of LK. Pedagogical implications are suggested. Good language learner Language learner strategy Linguistic knowledge Listening strategies Second language listening Language teaching research. -- 2021 (May), v. 25, n. 3, p. 540-564 Language teaching research. -- 2021 (May), v. 25, n. 3, p. 540-564 https://search-ebscohost-com.ezproxy.nebrija.es/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=50909971&lang=es&site=ehost-live Acceso al documento

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