Biblioteca Universidad Nebrija mOpac 2.3

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Revista: Arts and Humanities in Higher Education

(16 Registros)

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Resultados

The case for the primacy of visualcywithin a neoliberal Artschool curriculum [Texto impreso] / Howard Riley.

a b 210422s2021 gbr|||||r 0 ||eng d 120779 eng 2021 The case for the primacy of visualcywithin a neoliberal Artschool curriculum [Texto impreso] / Howard Riley. Este artículo se encuentra disponible en su edición impresa y electrónica. Los datos para su localización están accesibles a través del enlace al título de la publicación. Su acceso electrónico es a través del enlace de 'Acceso al documento'. References: p. 152-154. Whilst the faculties of literacy and numeracy are rightly recognised as worthy of pedagogical nurturing, this article champions a more venerable articulacy – visualcy– crucial to a healthy culture, arguing that the one domain of human inquiry which distinguishes the visual arts from other disciplines is surely that surrounding the faculty of vision. The ascendency within the contemporary artworld of a relational aesthetics is traced through a brief history of the relationships between visual artforms and their socio-political contexts. It is suggested that the shift of emphasis away from the perceptually intriguing is in part a consequence – perhaps unintended – of the neoliberal values permeating the UK Higher Education sector in the last decade. The article ends with a proposal for a visual arts pedagogy based on five key principles of visualcy explored through the medium of drawing, illustrated with work by the author and students. Drawing as language Visualcy Haptic values Distal values Proximal values Perceptual intrigue Revocational art Convocational art Conceptual intrigue Neoliberalism Arts and Humanities in Higher Education. --2021, v. 20 (April), n. 2, p. 133-154 Arts and Humanities in Higher Education. -- 2021, v. 20 (April), n. 2, p. 133-154 http://search.ebscohost.com.ezproxy.nebrija.es/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=53002762&lang=es&site=ehost-live Acceso al documento

Creativity is for poets and pop singers, isn’t it? [Texto impreso]: academic perspectives on creativity in doctoral writing / Steven Thurlow.

a b 210422s2021 gbr|||||r 0 ||eng d 120784 eng 2021 Creativity is for poets and pop singers, isn’t it? [Texto impreso]: academic perspectives on creativity in doctoral writing / Steven Thurlow. Este artículo se encuentra disponible en su edición impresa y electrónica. Los datos para su localización están accesibles a través del enlace al título de la publicación. Su acceso electrónico es a través del enlace de 'Acceso al documento'. References: p. 204-205. This paper investigates how eight academic research supervisors working in a Faculty of Arts at a research-intensive Australian university understand the notion of creativity in doctoral writing; both in relation to what it is and where it is found. This question was investigated qualitatively through interviews focusing on reader reception to three, short doctoral texts. A framework of indexicality and orientation (Lillis, 2008) was then used to move beyond the text-level and focus on the contextual influences surrounding the writing as it was exposed to its critical readership. The findings reflect varying levels of awareness and receptivity to the presence of creativity in written doctoral work. The paper also explores the perceived location of creativity in these texts for academic readers; namely, whether it resides in the ideas (i.e., the creative thought/content) or whether it was more textually-based (i.e., the creative expression/form of the idea) Creativity Doctoral writing Doctoral education Thesis writing Dissertation writing Creative idea Creative expression Perception of creativity Arts academics Doctoral supervisors Arts and Humanities in Higher Education. --2021, v. 20 (April), n. 2, p. 187-206 Arts and Humanities in Higher Education. -- 2021, v. 20 (April), n. 2, p. 187-206 http://search.ebscohost.com.ezproxy.nebrija.es/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=53219948&lang=es&site=ehost-live Acceso al documento

Critical thinking and the humanities [Texto impreso] : a case study of conceptualizations and teaching practices at the Section for Cinema Studies at Stockholm University / Joel Frykholm.

a b 210903s2021 gbr|||||r 0 ||eng d 123211 eng 2021 Critical thinking and the humanities [Texto impreso] : a case study of conceptualizations and teaching practices at the Section for Cinema Studies at Stockholm University / Joel Frykholm. Este artículo se encuentra disponible en su edición impresa y electrónica. Los datos para su localización están accesibles a través del enlace al título de la publicación. Su acceso electrónico es a través del enlace de 'Acceso al documento'. References: p. 271-273. The raison d’être of the humanities is widely held to reside in its unique ability to generate critical thinking and critical thinkers. But what is “critical thinking?” Is it a generalized mode of reasoning or a form of political critique? How does it relate to discipline-specific practices of scholarly pursuit? How does it relate to discourses of “post-truth” and “alternative facts”? How is it best taught? This essay explores these issues via a case study of conceptualizations of critical thinking among cinema scholars at Stockholm University, whose views are interpreted against the backdrop of (a) debates about the value of the humanities; (b) higher education scholarship on critical thinking; and (c) the legacy of certain disciplinary traditions within cinema studies, especially the paradigms of “post-theory” and “political modernism.” The interviews attest to the persistence of critical thinking as a fundamental, yet highly elusive, concept to higher education in the arts and humanities. Critical thinking Cinema studies Film studies Value of the humanities Disciplinary discourses Teacher interviews Arts and Humanities in Higher Education. --2021, v. 20 (July), n. 3, p. 253-273 Arts and Humanities in Higher Education. -- 2021, v. 20 (July), n. 3, p. 253-273 https://search-ebscohost-com.ezproxy.nebrija.es/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=54019874&lang=es&site=ehost-live Acceso al documento

Critique and post-critique in contemporary art history [Texto impreso]: excessive attachment to suspicion in academia and beyond / Sara Callahan.

a b 210410s2021 gbr|||||r 0 ||eng d 120623 eng 2021 Critique and post-critique in contemporary art history [Texto impreso]: excessive attachment to suspicion in academia and beyond / Sara Callahan. Este artículo se encuentra disponible en su edición impresa y electrónica. Los datos para su localización están accesibles a través del enlace al título de la publicación. Su acceso electrónico es a través del enlace de 'Acceso al documento'. References: p. 63-65. This essay offers a broad look at the way critique as a mode, method, and attitude in post-war art history research and teaching intersects with occurrences of critique in humanities scholarship and teaching generally, but also how distorted forms of critique occur in contexts outside the academic field. The essay outlines concerns raised by humanities scholars with what they consider to be an over-reliance on critique as a negative skill, resulting in scholarship that tears down without building up, and self-satisfied debunking of anything that does not stand up to the current era’s identity politics. The essay argues that the question of critique is of particular urgency to the field of contemporary art. Here critique is embedded in the material studied—artworks, artistic practices, and discourses—and therefore in dire need of being understood, challenged, and decentered as a method. Postcritique Post-critique Paranoid reading Hermeneutics of suspicion Critical thinking in higher education Contemporary art history Felski Latour Institutional critique Post-truth Sedgwick Arts and Humanities in Higher Education. --2021, v. 20 (February), n. 1, p. 42-65 Arts and Humanities in Higher Education. -- 2021, v. 20 (February), n. 1, p. 42-65 http://search.ebscohost.com.ezproxy.nebrija.es/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=51563904&lang=es&site=ehost-live Acceso al documento

From Sherbrooke to Stratford and back again [Texto impreso] : team teaching and experiential learning through “Shakesperience” / Jessica Riddell, Shannon Murray, Lisa Dickson.

a b 210422s2021 gbr|||||r 0 ||eng d 120783 eng 2021 From Sherbrooke to Stratford and back again [Texto impreso] : team teaching and experiential learning through “Shakesperience” / Jessica Riddell, Shannon Murray, Lisa Dickson. Este artículo se encuentra disponible en su edición impresa y electrónica. Los datos para su localización están accesibles a través del enlace al título de la publicación. Su acceso electrónico es a través del enlace de 'Acceso al documento'. References: p. 185-186. Attempting to teach theater in an English Literature course is a daunting prospect. A far cry from the highly individual experience of reading a novel or poem, theater is both a visual and communal kind of engagement. It is a challenge to capture this medium in a traditional lecture-based classroom and harder still to convey its three-dimensionality to undergraduate students. In this paper, we argue that experiential learning and team teaching are especially resonant in the exploration of Shakespearean studies because of the active and collaborative nature of his theater and plays. This paper draws out avenues for experiential learning in the humanities that should have broad applicability and interest a wide range of readers. Framing our design, implementation, and critical reflection in the relevant research, we provide an example of how to anchor experiential learning in the humanities in practice. The case study outlines a compact spring session course on Shakespeare’s plays and performance that includes in-class, online, and field study components. Our research reveals that this approach mirrors in several key ways the collaborative work at the heart of Shakespearean drama and of theater more generally: students are exposed to the plays on the page, on the stage, and behind the scenes; they are offered a model of collaborative knowledge-making both in the theater and in the team-based course design and delivery; and, with these examples before them, they are encouraged to take risks, to collaborate, and to form communities of their own in their learning. In the conclusion we devote attention to funding and the cost associated with experiential learning and field courses. This paper explores experiential learning and field-based immersive learning into the context of disciplinary-specific humanities classrooms with the goal of increasing interaction among students and enhancing students’ learning (Béchard and Pelletier, 2001) Experiential learning Shakespeare Theater Field school Collaborative teaching Arts and Humanities in Higher Education. --2021, v. 20 (April), n. 2, p. 172-186 Arts and Humanities in Higher Education. -- 2021, v. 20 (April), n. 2, p. 172-186 http://search.ebscohost.com.ezproxy.nebrija.es/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=53002764&lang=es&site=ehost-live Acceso al documento

Hands-on versus virtual [Texto impreso] :reshaping the design classroom with blended learning / Katja Fleischmann.

a b 210410s2021 gbr|||||r 0 ||eng d 120625 eng 2021 Hands-on versus virtual [Texto impreso] :reshaping the design classroom with blended learning / Katja Fleischmann. Este artículo se encuentra disponible en su edición impresa y electrónica. Los datos para su localización están accesibles a través del enlace al título de la publicación. Su acceso electrónico es a través del enlace de 'Acceso al documento'. References: p. 109-112. The heart of design studio teaching is traditionally linked to one-on-one teaching activities and to the exchange of feedback prompting many design educators to think it does not lend itself to online delivery. This study explored how design educators can translate the essence of design studio pedagogy into a blended learning environment. The four-year study involving 119 first-year undergraduate design students reports on the development, implementation, and iteration of a blended learning experience in an introductory design subject. The subject followed a flipped classroom model where video lectures, software tutorials, and additional readings were delivered online through a Learning Management System; practical face-to-face tutorials allowed students to work on their projects, present their work, and engage in the dialogical learning process. Student and design instructor feedback was collected to evaluate the changes and overall effectiveness of the design of the blended learning experience, which proved to be effective. Design education Blended learning Design studio Online design studio Technology-enhanced learning Flipped classroom Arts and Humanities in Higher Education. --2021, v. 20 (February), n. 1, p. 87-112 Arts and Humanities in Higher Education. -- 2021, v. 20 (February), n. 1, p. 87-112 http://search.ebscohost.com.ezproxy.nebrija.es/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=53002665&lang=es&site=ehost-live Acceso al documento

How argumentative writing stifles open-mindedness [Texto impreso] / James Southworth.

a b 210423s2021 gbr|||||r 0 ||eng d 120799 eng 2021 How argumentative writing stifles open-mindedness [Texto impreso] / James Southworth. Este artículo se encuentra disponible en su edición impresa y electrónica. Los datos para su localización están accesibles a través del enlace al título de la publicación. Su acceso electrónico es a través del enlace de 'Acceso al documento'. References: p. 224-227. A longstanding assumption within higher education is that there is a clear link between argumentative writing and critical thinking. In this paper, I challenge this assumption. I argue that argumentative writing genres of persuasion, inquiry, and consensus fail to target students’ open-mindedness, which is an important aspect of critical thinking. In particular, argumentative writing genres do not challenge students to confront key cognitive biases, namely confirmation bias and motivated reasoning, when engaging in moral, political, and/or social questions. The motivation to conduct a balanced selection of evidence as well as an unbiased interpretation of evidence is overshadowed by the motivation to preserve one’s prior beliefs. The structure of argumentative writing genres thereby stifles open-mindedness and can even nurture dogmatism. As a result, in our goal to develop students’ critical thinking skills through argumentative writing, we may be doing more harm than good. Cognitive bias Argumentative writing Motivated reasoning Confirmation bias Open-mindedness Critical thinking Arts and Humanities in Higher Education. --2021, v. 20 (April), n. 2, p. 207-227 Arts and Humanities in Higher Education. -- 2021, v. 20 (April), n. 2, p. 207-227 http://search.ebscohost.com.ezproxy.nebrija.es/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=53002646&lang=es&site=ehost-live Acceso al documento

How do we integrate skills and content in classics? [Texto impreso]: an inquiry into students’ use of sources / Karl A. Goodwin, Kathleen M. Quinlan.

a b 210410s2021 gbr|||||r 0 ||eng d 120624 eng 2021 How do we integrate skills and content in classics? [Texto impreso]: an inquiry into students’ use of sources / Karl A. Goodwin, Kathleen M. Quinlan. Este artículo se encuentra disponible en su edición impresa y electrónica. Los datos para su localización están accesibles a través del enlace al título de la publicación. Su acceso electrónico es a través del enlace de 'Acceso al documento'. References: p. 83-85. Engagement with primary sources is a key feature of arts and humanities subjects, particularly classics and ancient history. Recent instructional trends emphasise integrating skills with content, particularly in the first year of higher education. We investigate how successfully first-year university students used a variety of sources in an integrated skills and content course, through analysis of 84 final essays. Most students used four to nine sources in a 1500 word essay, but only one type of ancient source. The findings express the need to move from debates about whether to integrate skills or not, to greater discuss howkey discipline-specific skills are integrated into content-based courses. Cognitive apprenticeship theory, and a thematic approach used in museum education, are used to reflect on the findings and discuss how teachers might better support students in this key aspect of the discipline. Cognitive apprenticeship theory Transition Classical studies Ancient history Teaching Source engagement College Arts and Humanities in Higher Education. --2021, v. 20 (February), n. 1, p. 66-86 Arts and Humanities in Higher Education. -- 2021, v. 20 (February), n. 1, p. 66-86 http://search.ebscohost.com.ezproxy.nebrija.es/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=53090599&lang=es&site=ehost-live Acceso al documento

An inclusive pedagogy in Arts and Humanities university classrooms [Texto impreso] : what faculty members do / Rafael Carballo, Almudena Cotán, Yolanda Spinola-Elias.

a b 210326s2021 gbr|||||r 0 ||eng d 120536 eng 2021 An inclusive pedagogy in Arts and Humanities university classrooms [Texto impreso] : what faculty members do / Rafael Carballo, Almudena Cotán, Yolanda Spinola-Elias. Este artículo se encuentra disponible en su edición impresa y electrónica. Los datos para su localización están accesibles a través del enlace al título de la publicación. Su acceso electrónico es a través del enlace de 'Acceso al documento'. References: p. 39-41. This article shows the educational strategies developed by faculty members that their students with disabilities considered as excellent for carrying out an inclusive pedagogy in Higher Education. One hundred and nineteen faculty members from 10 Spanish public universities participated in the study, 24 of whom were from the field of Arts and Humanities. Through a qualitative methodology, individual semi-structured interview was used for data collection. The data were analyzed inductively through a categories and codes system. The results show how the participants considered students' opinions when designing their methods. Moreover, the study shows the teaching strategies that the participants used to ensure the participation of all their students. Lastly, the article describes how the participants attended to the concerns of students with disabilities. Finally, we discuss these results with previous studies, and we consider the main elements for an inclusive pedagogy that may serve as an example for other faculty members. Inclusive pedagogy Arts and Humanities faculty members Higher education Students with disabilities Qualitative methodology Arts and Humanities in Higher Education. --2021, v. 20 (February), n. 1, p. 21-41 Arts and Humanities in Higher Education. -- 2021, v. 20 (February), n. 1, p. 21-41 http://search.ebscohost.com.ezproxy.nebrija.es/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=51396029&lang=es&site=ehost-live Acceso al documento

Inquiry-based learning in the Humanities [Texto impreso] : moving from topics to problems using the “Humanities imagination” / Jakob E. Feldt, and Eva B. Petersen.

a b 210422s2021 gbr|||||r 0 ||eng d 120780 eng 2021 Inquiry-based learning in the Humanities [Texto impreso] : moving from topics to problems using the “Humanities imagination” / Jakob E. Feldt, and Eva B. Petersen. Este artículo se encuentra disponible en su edición impresa y electrónica. Los datos para su localización están accesibles a través del enlace al título de la publicación. Su acceso electrónico es a través del enlace de 'Acceso al documento'. References: p. 170-171. In this article, we present a new perspective on how to combine inquiry-based, problem-oriented learning with practices in the Humanities. Our particular interest is how the initial phase of finding “the problem” can be undertaken in a conjoint way with students, that is in the form of inquiry-based learning where there are no pre-defined questions set by the teacher. Inspired by C. Wright Mills, we argue that “the imagination” is key to opening up inquiries into problems, for students and researchers alike. Through an outline of what we call “the Humanities imagination” we develop a set of heuristics for stimulating a turn from topics to problems in the context of the Humanities. We show how combining inquiry-based learning with the Humanities suggests both new pedagogical practices, new models (the teacher as interlocutor), and a new balancing of the ecology of the Humanities emphasizing its particular imaginary over its disciplines. Inquiry-based learning Problem-orientation The Humanities imagination John Dewey Philology The student as producer Arts and Humanities in Higher Education. --2021, v. 20 (April), n. 2, p. 155-171 Arts and Humanities in Higher Education. -- 2021, v. 20 (April), n. 2, p. 155-171 http://search.ebscohost.com.ezproxy.nebrija.es/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=53002673&lang=es&site=ehost-live Acceso al documento

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