Biblioteca Universidad Nebrija mOpac 2.3

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Beautiful and confident [Texto impreso] : how boosting self-perceived attractiveness reduces preference uncertainty in context-dependent choices / Zixi Jiang ... [et al.].

a b 211019s2021 usa|||p| 0 |eng d 124746 eng 2021 Beautiful and confident [Texto impreso] : how boosting self-perceived attractiveness reduces preference uncertainty in context-dependent choices / Zixi Jiang ... [et al.]. Este artículo se encuentra disponible en su edición impresa y electrónica. Los datos para su localización están accesibles a través del enlace al título de la publicación. Su acceso electrónico es a través del enlace de 'Acceso al documento'. References: p. 922-924. Abstract: Despite marketers' efforts to make consumers feel attractive in many sales and advertising contexts, little is known about how consumers’ self-perceived physical attractiveness influences their decision making. The authors examine whether a boost in consumers’ self-perceived attractiveness influences subsequent choices in domains unrelated to beauty. Across six studies, the authors find converging evidence that a boost in consumers’ self-perceived attractiveness enhances their general self-confidence and reduces preference uncertainty, resulting in less reliance on the choice context and thus fewer choices of compromise, all-average, and default options. The findings further show that consumers use self-confidence as metacognitive information for inferring preference uncertainty in subsequent decisions. This process is a misattribution that can be attenuated when consumers attribute their self-confidence to the self-perceived attractiveness. The article concludes with a discussion of theoretical and managerial implications. Self-perceived attractiveness Self-confidence Preference uncertainty Context effects Metacognitive information Misattribution Context-dependent choices Journal of marketing research. -- 2021, v. 58 n. 5, october, p. 908-924 Journal of marketing research. -- 2021, v. 58 n. 5, october, p. 908-924 https://search-ebscohost-com.ezproxy.nebrija.es/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=58041770&lang=es&site=ehost-live Acceso al documento

Choosing the light meal [Texto impreso] : real-time aggregation of calorie information reduces meal calories / Eric M. VanEpps ... [et al.].

a b 211018s2021 usa|||p| 0 |eng d 124719 eng 2021 Choosing the light meal [Texto impreso] : real-time aggregation of calorie information reduces meal calories / Eric M. VanEpps ... [et al.]. Este artículo se encuentra disponible en su edición impresa y electrónica. Los datos para su localización están accesibles a través del enlace al título de la publicación. Su acceso electrónico es a través del enlace de 'Acceso al documento'. References: p. 965-967. Abstract: Numeric labeling of calories on restaurant menus has been implemented widely, but scientific studies have generally not found substantial effects on calories ordered. The present research tests the impact of a feedback format that is more targeted at how consumers select and revise their meals: real-time aggregation of calorie content to provide dynamic feedback about meal calories via a traffic light label. Because these labels intuitively signal when a meal shifts from healthy to unhealthy (via the change from green to a yellow or red light), they prompt decision makers to course-correct in real time, before they finalize their choice. Results from five preregistered experiments (N = 11,900) show that providing real-time traffic light feedback about the total caloric content of a meal reduces calories in orders, even compared with similar aggregated feedback in numeric format. Patterns of ordering reveal this effect to be driven by people revising high-calorie orders more frequently, leading them to choose fewer and lower-calorie items. Consumers also like traffic light aggregation, indicating greater satisfaction with their order and greater intentions to return to restaurants that use them. The authors discuss how dynamic feedback using intuitive signals could yield benefits in contexts beyond food choice. Calorie labeling Food ordering Aggregation Traffic light Dynamic feedback Revisions Intuitive Journal of marketing research. -- 2021, v. 58 n. 5, october, p. 948-967 Journal of marketing research. -- 2021, v. 58 n. 5, october, p. 948-967 https://search-ebscohost-com.ezproxy.nebrija.es/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=57680140&lang=es&site=ehost-live Acceso al documento

Commercial success through commercials? [Texto impreso] : advertising and pay-TV operators / Joonhyuk Yang, Jung Youn Lee, and Pradeep K. Chintagunta.

a b 211018s2021 usa|||p| 0 |eng d 124718 eng 2021 Commercial success through commercials? [Texto impreso] : advertising and pay-TV operators / Joonhyuk Yang, Jung Youn Lee, and Pradeep K. Chintagunta. Este artículo se encuentra disponible en su edición impresa y electrónica. Los datos para su localización están accesibles a través del enlace al título de la publicación. Su acceso electrónico es a través del enlace de 'Acceso al documento'. References: p. 945-947. Abstract: The U.S. pay television service market was dominated by cable operators until the nationwide entry of satellite operators in the early 1990s. The latter have been consistently growing their footprints since. This study documents the role of television advertising to explain satellite operators’ success. Using data on U.S. households’ subscription choices and operators’ advertising decisions, the authors document both demand- and supply-side conditions conducive to the growth of the satellite operators. First, the authors find that consumers in this market were sensitive to advertising, and especially so to that of the satellite operators (ad elasticities of about .05–.06 for satellite operators vs. .02 for cable operators). The authors employ a border strategy to demonstrate advertising-elastic demand and discuss its robustness to potential threats to identification. Second, the authors provide suggestive evidence that a form of asymmetric cost efficiencies in television advertising benefited the entrants more than the incumbents. Specifically, the unit costs of local advertising tend to be higher than those of national advertising, which likely allowed the satellite operators to better leverage their national presence with (cheaper) national advertising. Overall, this study highlights the interaction between advertising efficiencies and the scale of entry in explaining the competition between market incumbents and entrants. Advertising Border strategy Cost advantage Television service market Journal of marketing research. -- 2021, v. 58 n. 5, october, p. 925-947 Journal of marketing research. -- 2021, v. 58 n. 5, october, p. 925-947 https://search-ebscohost-com.ezproxy.nebrija.es/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=57727881&lang=es&site=ehost-live Acceso al documento

Competition and firm service reliability decisions [Texto impreso]: a study of the airline industry / Chen Zhou, Paulo Albuquerque, and Rajdeep Grewal.

a b 210406s2021 usa|||p| 0 |eng d 120569 eng 2021 Competition and firm service reliability decisions [Texto impreso]: a study of the airline industry / Chen Zhou, Paulo Albuquerque, and Rajdeep Grewal. Este artículo se encuentra disponible en su edición impresa y electrónica. Los datos para su localización están accesibles a través del enlace al título de la publicación. Su acceso electrónico es a través del enlace de 'Acceso al documento'. References: p. 397-399. Abstract: To understand the impact of competition on organizational service reliability decisions, this study investigates whether firms in the airline industry consider competitors’ actions when making their service reliability decisions. Using data from the U.S. Bureau of Transportation Statistics on flight cancellation rates and average length of flight delays, the authors use two complementary approaches, a simultaneous equation model and a discrete game framework, to examine competitive influence on firm decisions on the level of service reliability. The authors find that competitive effects are asymmetric and differ by the type of firm and its competitors—full-service versus low-cost airlines—as well by level of market concentration. The authors show that internal initiatives, such as on-time bonuses, can substantially improve service reliability but require the firm to account for competitive reactions. Ignoring competitive effects leads to an overestimation of the impact of these programs on service reliability levels. Airline industry Cancellation rates Competition Flight delays Service reliability Simultaneous discrete game Simultaneous equation model Journal of marketing research. -- 2021, v. 58 n. 2, april, p. 377-399 Journal of marketing research. -- 2021, v. 58 n. 2, april, p. 377-399 http://search.ebscohost.com.ezproxy.nebrija.es/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=55340195&lang=es&site=ehost-live Acceso al documento

Constraining ideas [Texto impreso] : how seeing ideas of others harms creativity in open innovation / Reto Hofstetter ... [et al.].

a b 210202s2021 usa|||p| 0 |eng d 118771 eng 2021 Constraining ideas [Texto impreso] : how seeing ideas of others harms creativity in open innovation / Reto Hofstetter ... [et al.]. Este artículo se encuentra disponible en su edición impresa y electrónica. Los datos para su localización están accesibles a través del enlace al título de la publicación. Su acceso electrónico es a través del enlace de 'Acceso al documento'. References: p. 112-114. Abstract: Open innovation contests that display all submitted ideas to participants are a popular way for firms to generate ideas. In such contest-based ideation, the authors show that seeing numerous competitive ideas of others harms, rather than stimulates, creative performance (Study 1). Others' competitive prior ideas interfere with idea generation, as new ideas need to be differentiated from the preceding ones to be original. Exposure to an increasing number of prior ideas thus heightens individuals' perceived constraints of expressing ideas and harms creative performance (Studies 2 and 3). Furthermore, creative performance monotonically reduces with an increasing number of prior ideas (Study 4). A final study demonstrates that showing only a limited number of ideas as well as grouping prior ideas offer actionable ways to reduce prior ideas' harmful influence (Study 5). These results illustrate viable ways to improve contest-based ideation outcomes merely by changing how competitive prior ideas are presented. Creativity Crowdsourcing Open innovation Innovation contests User-generated content Journal of marketing research. -- 2021, v. 58 n. 1, february, p. 95-114 Journal of marketing research. -- 2021, v. 58 n. 1, february, p. 95-114 http://search.ebscohost.com.ezproxy.nebrija.es/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=55043953&lang=es&site=ehost-live Acceso al documento

Consumer rational (in)attention to favorable and unfavorable product information, and firm information design [Texto impreso] / Kinshuk Jerath and Qitian Ren.

a b 210326s2021 usa|||p| 0 |eng d 120548 eng 2021 Consumer rational (in)attention to favorable and unfavorable product information, and firm information design [Texto impreso] / Kinshuk Jerath and Qitian Ren. Este artículo se encuentra disponible en su edición impresa y electrónica. Los datos para su localización están accesibles a través del enlace al título de la publicación. Su acceso electrónico es a través del enlace de 'Acceso al documento'. References: p. 361-362. Abstract: The authors study how a consumer optimally allocates attention to favorable and unfavorable product-related information before making the purchase decision, when information processing is costly. They find that attention allocation depends on, among other factors, the consumer’s prior belief about whether the product matches their needs and their unit information processing cost. A consumer processes both “confirmatory” and “disconfirmatory” information to their prior belief, but to different degrees under different conditions. In general, if the consumer has an extreme prior, or if the unit cost of processing information is high such that only a small amount of information is optimally processed, they process more confirmatory than disconfirmatory information; this offers a rational explanation for the phenomenon known as “confirmation bias.” The authors also find that a seller can benefit by influencing the consumer’s attention allocation by strategically choosing how much favorable and unfavorable information to make available for the consumer to process and by influencing the information processing cost, where the optimal strategy depends on the seller’s ability to adjust product price. Surprisingly, a seller has a lower incentive to suppress unfavorable information when the consumer has a worse prior belief about product fit. The authors illustrate their model with an application to information provision in product reviews. Attention allocation Confirmation bias Consumer search Hypothesis-confirming/-disconfirming search Information design Positive/negative test strategy Journal of marketing research. -- 2021, v. 58 n. 2, april, p. 343-362 Journal of marketing research. -- 2021, v. 58 n. 2, april, p. 343-362 http://search.ebscohost.com.ezproxy.nebrija.es/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=55357074&lang=es&site=ehost-live Acceso al documento

Consumers' preference for user-designed versus designer-designed products [Texto impreso] : the moderating role of power distance belief / Xiaobing Song, Jihye Jung, and Yinlong Zhang.

a b 210202s2021 usa|||p| 0 |eng d 118779 eng 2021 Consumers' preference for user-designed versus designer-designed products [Texto impreso] : the moderating role of power distance belief / Xiaobing Song, Jihye Jung, and Yinlong Zhang. Este artículo se encuentra disponible en su edición impresa y electrónica. Los datos para su localización están accesibles a través del enlace al título de la publicación. Su acceso electrónico es a través del enlace de 'Acceso al documento'. References: p. 179-181. Abstract: Anecdotal evidence and extant research show that consumers can prefer both user-designed and designer-designed products. However, the factors that moderate such preferences are not well understood. The authors posit power distance belief (PDB) as a moderator such that low-PDB consumers prefer user-designed to designer-designed products because they identify more with user-driven companies. In contrast, high-PDB consumers prefer designer-designed to user-designed products due to their stronger trust in designer-driven companies. Six studies examining power distance belief at both the country and individual levels provide convergent support for the proposed moderating effect of PDB and underlying mechanisms. Furthermore, the authors demonstrate that the interaction between design philosophy and PDB is more likely for low-complexity than high-complexity products. Power distance belief User design Designer design Identification Trust Journal of marketing research. -- 2021, v. 58 n. 1, february, p. 163-181 Journal of marketing research. -- 2021, v. 58 n. 1, february, p. 163-181 http://search.ebscohost.com.ezproxy.nebrija.es/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=55043958&lang=es&site=ehost-live Acceso al documento

Customer satisfaction and firm profits in monopolies [Texto impreso]: a study of utilities / Abhi Bhattacharya, Neil A. Morgan, and Lopo L. Rego.

a b 210202s2021 usa|||p| 0 |eng d 118783 eng 2021 Customer satisfaction and firm profits in monopolies [Texto impreso]: a study of utilities / Abhi Bhattacharya, Neil A. Morgan, and Lopo L. Rego. Este artículo se encuentra disponible en su edición impresa y electrónica. Los datos para su localización están accesibles a través del enlace al título de la publicación. Su acceso electrónico es a través del enlace de 'Acceso al documento'. References: p. 220-222. Abstract: There is a growing body of evidence that customer satisfaction is predictive of firms’ future financial performance. However, studies of this relationship have been limited to competitive markets, and monopolistic markets have been largely ignored. This study explores the large and important utilities market and exploits its unique regulatory requirements that generate detailed and reliable operating and accounting data to examine the overall relationship between customer satisfaction and utility profit and establish the causal mechanisms involved. Using data from U.S. public utility firms, the authors show that even when customer satisfaction does not affect future revenues, it does positively predict future profitability by reducing utility firm operating costs. More specifically, they find that higher satisfaction reduces the costs of utility firm distribution, customer service, and sales and general administration expenses. These findings and additional post hoc evidence are consistent with the notion that customer satisfaction (1) generates efficiency-enhancing benefits for utility firms by lowering the direct and employee engagement costs of dealing with dissatisfied customers and (2) fosters greater trust and cooperation from customers. This study has important implications for both managers and regulators and provides important new insights for market-based asset theory and regulatory economic theory. Customer satisfaction Firm efficiency Firm performance Operating costs Public utilities Journal of marketing research. -- 2021, v. 58 n. 1, february, p. 202-222 Journal of marketing research. -- 2021, v. 58 n. 1, february, p. 202-222 http://search.ebscohost.com.ezproxy.nebrija.es/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=55043961&lang=es&site=ehost-live Acceso al documento

The dark side of mobile app adoption [Texto impreso] : examining the impact on customers' multichannel purchase / Xian Gu and P.K. Kannan.

a b 210325s2021 usa|||p| 0 |eng d 120533 eng 2021 The dark side of mobile app adoption [Texto impreso] : examining the impact on customers' multichannel purchase / Xian Gu and P.K. Kannan. Este artículo se encuentra disponible en su edición impresa y electrónica. Los datos para su localización están accesibles a través del enlace al título de la publicación. Su acceso electrónico es a través del enlace de 'Acceso al documento'. References: p. 264. Abstract: Firms use mobile applications to engage with customers, provide services, and encourage customer purchase. Conventional wisdom and previous research indicate that apps have a positive effect on customer spending. The authors critically examine this premise in a highly competitive institutional context by estimating how customers’ multichannel spending changes after adopting a hotel group’s app and identifying the factors contributing to such change. Exploiting the variation in customers’ timing of app adoption and using a difference-in-differences approach, the authors find that the effect of app adoption on customers’ overall spending is significant and negative. Additional analyses suggest the possibility that customers who adopt the focal app also adopt competitor apps and therefore search more and shop around, leading to decreased share of wallet with the focal hotel group. The authors also find that the negative effect on spending is smaller for customers who use the app for mobile check-in service than those who use the app for only searching, highlighting the role of app engagement in mitigating the negative effect. Difference-in-differences Mobile apps Mobile marketing Multichannel marketing Journal of marketing research. -- 2021, v. 58 n. 2, april, p. 246-264 Journal of marketing research. -- 2021, v. 58 n. 2, april, p. 246-264 http://search.ebscohost.com.ezproxy.nebrija.es/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=55427555&lang=es&site=ehost-live Acceso al documento

Do activity-based incentive plans work? [Texto impreso] : evidence from a large-scale field intervention / Raghunath Singh Rao ... [et al.].

a b 210914s2021 usa|||p| 0 |eng d 123350 eng 2021 Do activity-based incentive plans work? [Texto impreso] : evidence from a large-scale field intervention / Raghunath Singh Rao ... [et al.]. Este artículo se encuentra disponible en su edición impresa y electrónica. Los datos para su localización están accesibles a través del enlace al título de la publicación. Su acceso electrónico es a través del enlace de 'Acceso al documento'. References: p. 703-704. Abstract: Many firms incorporate activity-based incentive (ABI) compensation into their pay plans. These ABIs are based on salespeople’s activity measures derived from their call reports. Despite their prevalence and theory-based expectations, there is a distinct lack of empirical work studying the sales productivity effects of ABI pay. With the cooperation of a large pharmaceutical firm, the authors conducted a three-year-long intervention based on a “treatment-removal” design. Their first intervention added modest ABI pay for frontline salespeople and their supervisors across 305 sales territories; the second intervention removed ABI pay from the salespeople; and the third intervention removed ABI pay from the supervisors as well, returning to the status quo. Using detailed territory-level data from the intervention in conjunction with syndicated market-level data and employing synthetic control procedures, the authors find sales gains of around 6%–9% from each of the two ABI interventions relative to the no-ABI baseline. These effects are moderated by the number of salespeople in a territory, with territories with more salespeople showing larger effects. Analyses of activity effects show that when supervisors are paid ABIs, they exert behavior control downward on salespeople. Managerially, both ABI schemes improve performance over an output-only pay plan. Between the two, a rudimentary gross profit impact calculation shows that ABIs targeted at supervisors alone are more efficient than ABIs targeted at both salespeople and their supervisors. The results support tying compensation to call reports despite the potential for self-serving biases in these measures because supervisors are able to exercise more behavior control with ABIs. Activity-based incentives Field experiments Sales compensation Principal-agent theory Synthetic control Journal of marketing research. -- 2021, v. 58 n. 4, august, p. 686-704 Journal of marketing research. -- 2021, v. 58 n. 4, august, p. 686-704 https://search-ebscohost-com.ezproxy.nebrija.es/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eoah&AN=56695120&lang=es&site=ehost-live Acceso al documento

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